Climate change affects natural food productivity. With poor rains in different regions of the world, food productivity suffers. Harvests rise only with an abundance of rainfall. In poorer countries, technology cannot find a means to deal with the issue. These countries face widespread drought. A perfect example would be the Sahel:

http://oceanworld.tamu.edu/resources/environment-book/Images/water-hole-cattle.jpg

 

 

In the Sudan there is a scarcity of water. The droughts that gripped Sudan have doubtless played a role in the conflict by increasing competition for water and land between farmers

 

 

Climate changes can also change storms in general. Tropical storms and hurricanes are likely to become more intense, produce stronger peak winds, and produce increased rainfall over some areas due to warming sea surface temperatures.

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7 responses »

  1. bhall1 says:

    As if Darfur doesn’t have enough problems to deal with already. Parts of Central Africa are dealing with genocide and corruption and now they don’t even have water to drink. The climate of Africa already lends itself to harsh living conditions and it’s only going to get worse if things keep going the way they are.

  2. bhall1 says:

    Ignore the comment above it was intended for another article, i’ll post it there.

  3. bhall1 says:

    It’s quite serendipitous that the people who are affected by climate change the most on the day to day, contribute the least to its effects. They are without the proper technology to deal with something that is affecting them so greatly, and yet we have the means but not the motivation. I’d be pissed if I was from Sahel.

  4. Ciera Fedock says:

    One thing you might consider as well is the companies that benefit from such conditions. Water coalitions as they call themselves (some run by the world bank) turn a sizeable profit from the misfortune of the peoples facing droughts. They sell the people water tokens which then they have to walk miles in order to collect water for their families and crops.

  5. In a place where water is practically sacred, I find it strange that people aren’t doing anything to help these people. These people who live in a place where we call “The third world” barely have enough to put a single meal on the table. Now they have to face with the fact that drought is consistent every year and water is becoming scarce.

    Wouldn’t these be signs that people would see and try to do something?
    Not just in Africa but in the states and highly industrialized area. We are the main reason for climate change, then we are the people who can change climate change to the positive.

    -Asage

  6. Not to be a negative nancy, but I can’t help but feel like in the grand scheme of things, the reason we feel like we’re always dealing with climate conflicts (drought, flood, etc) is because we’re constantly trying to control everything here on Earth. There was a time when, if there was a drought, everyone would starve and die and that would be the end of that. The reason we have overpopulation is because we’re trying to keep everybody alive all the time when the environmental or natural factors of a region can’t support human existence anymore. Doesn’t help that we’re poisoning our planet and screwing up our climate.

    -Victor

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